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     EduGorilla 
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    The real problem with the Indian anti-profiteering law as it stands today is that while it requires firms to pass on commensurate savings from GST cuts or input credit to consumers, it doesn’t specify how firms must determine what is ‘commensurate’. Enforcing these rules may have been somewhat simpler had India gone the way of Australia or Malaysia, to lay down a normal unit margin or net profit margin for each product, say three months ahead of the GST rollout. The task has become doubly difficult now, especially with the GST Council constantly tinkering with rates. Given the ambiguity, the NAA now needs to strike a fine balance between protecting consumer interests and ensuring that its investigations don’t place an undue compliance burden on businesses. Perhaps it can identify oligopolistic sectors more prone to profiteering and focus its energies on them.

    With reference to the above passage, following assumptions have been made;
    1. Subjectivity in law is a recipe for litigations
    2. Oligopolistic sectors require less monitoring to protect consumer interests
    Which one of the following assumption(s) is/are true? 

    Options :-

    1. 1 only
    2. 2 only

    3. Both 1 and 2

    4. Neither 1 nor 2

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